Common Miscommunications Between Sexual Partners
It’s commonly known that communication is key to any strong relationship.
It’s commonly known that communication is key to any strong relationship. Being open and honest helps you grow as a couple and keeps you involved intimately in each other’s lives. However, it’s important to communicate about more than just your daily activities and feelings, communication in the bedroom is equally (if not more) pertinent to a strong bond between partners. Dr. Steve McGough takes us through the common miscommunications sexual partners face and how to deal with them and move forward to build a stronger, more successful relationship.

One Partner Thinks Something is Wrong with Them


The most common miscommunication I've seen is that women frequently think there's something wrong with them (or that this is just the way it is for couples) if they are not sexually satisfied or achieve orgasm(s) with their partner during intimacy. This can also include the belief some have that they need to achieve orgasm via intercourse, when in reality only a small percentage of women can actually achieve this. In some cases, women aren't comfortable talking with their partner about all of these issues. In other cases, they try to talk, but their partner doesn't understand or in the worst case doesn’t seem interested at all.

Accepting a Diminished Sex Life as Real Life Gets Busier


Another common miscommunication couples have is when the relationship matures and each partner gets older and busier with life, and they each assume (and fail to talk to the other about how) that it's "normal" for their sex lives to become less passionate. Frequently, women will lose their desire for sexual activity. While this does happen for many couples, it doesn't have to.

What Sex and Love Actually Mean


A very common miscommunication between partners is what "sex" (and "love") actually mean to each. Also, what each partner thinks the other should want to do and be able to do sexually. In reality, our beliefs about sexuality have layers of meanings. We sometimes don't even fully realize what our beliefs about each are because we've never thought about it. We often don't share this with our partner, but assume they have the same beliefs.


Dr. Steve McGough, D.H.S is the Director of R&D, CTO hi® Master Level instructor and Director of R&D at Women and Couples Wellness, LLC, Associate Professor of Clinical Sexology, Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality. Steve is regularly interviewed by outlets such as Prevention, Redbook, CNBC, MSN, Women’s Health, Medical Daily, Glamour, Ask Men, etc. Steve McGough discovered the technology behind “hi” when trying to help Wendy (his wife) recover from a tragedy.

Dr. Steve McGough

"Dr. Steve McGough the author of numerous books dealing with wellness, massage, and intimacy. He has a Doctorate of Human Sexuality from the IASHS, and a BS in Biochemistry (focusing on nutrition) from UNC-Chapel Hill. Steve has an extensive background in massage and various Asian healing practices. He's the Director of R&D at Women and Couples Wellness, and a professor of Clinical Sexology. During graduate research, Steve developed new techniques to help women with anorgasmia (inability to achieve orgasm). Through this, he's worked with several thousand women and couples researching female orgasm. Steve has been published in academic journals on topics ranging from neuroscience research to sexology. He has multiple US & International patents in areas for women's pelvic and sexual health. A distinction with his approach is the view that sexual health is an integral part of overall health. Steve is frequently interviewed in Prevention, Women's Health, Medical Daily, CNBC, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, Redbook, Ask Men, etc. He & his wife Wendy frequently teach at Young Swingers Week, Naughty N Nawlins, Hedonism II, etc.
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