Join Free Now

Why is it Important to Have a Healthy Sex Life?

Having a healthy sex life is part of being healthy overall.

That question has a different answer depending on each person -- and situation -- so this can at best be a generalization. That being said, for most people both as individuals and couples, sexual desire and sexual expression are part of being healthy. This changes over time depending on age, health and stress levels but having a healthy sex life is part of being healthy overall.

For many couples, it is the physical sexual attraction and desire for intimacy that attracted them originally. A healthy sex life is a wonderful way to maintain that intimacy and bond, while helping relieve stress and improve general health. Plus if both partners are sexually satisfied it is generally a good indication they are in a relationship where they take care of each other’s needs. This usually shows up in other areas of the relationship, as well. As couples age, their sex drive may decrease (sometimes), but the act of intimacy is still an important aspect of their lives for deeper emotional and spiritual reasons.


What are 5-6 signs your sex life isn't everything it could be, with a brief explanation for each sign?


1 - You don't enjoy the experience because your partner doesn't know how to please you sexually. This is especially common with heterosexual relationships where the man doesn't adequately stimulate the female partner before intercourse.

Sometimes, to make the first situation worse where your partner isn't doing things the way you want or not enough, etc., you're embarrassed to tell them. Many people aren't even comfortable saying, “That feels good -- keep doing that.”  Or, “I really liked it when you did … let’s try that again.” As a result, their partner may think they're pleasing them when actually they aren't.

2 - You and your partner have mismatched sexual desires. Meaning they're in the mood you're exhausted, but then when you're in the mood they're tired or neither reads cues that the other wants sex. This can be made worse when you and your partner don't communicate your needs well. Many times one partner will be in the mood while the other isn't. However, later when the other partner is in the mood the first partner doesn't realize it. Over time, this causes unhappiness for both partners.

3 - You are totally stressed out about something and the thought of being with your partner doesn't get you in the mood anymore.

4 - You are embarrassed to be nude around your partner or have other negative body issues. This can often cause stress and makes it very difficult to feel sexually aroused. Plus, it limits your ability to relax and truly express yourself sexually.

5 - You're bored. Most couples don't share with each other what they really want sexually and are afraid the other will judge them if they do. This can range from being afraid to share fantasies to things you'd like to try like a new position or different location in the house.

6 - Sexual activity is painful, which could indicate there's an underlying health challenge. For instance vaginismus (painful intercourse) and vulvodynia (generalized pelvic pain) are more common than most people think, and tend to be under reported because women are often embarrassed to bring it up with their health care provider (as well, health care providers sometimes don't understand the conditions).




Dr. Steve McGough, D.H.S is the Director of R&D, CTO hi® Master Level instructor and Director of R&D at Women and Couples Wellness, LLC, Associate Professor of Clinical Sexology, Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality. Steve is regularly interviewed by outlets such as Prevention, Redbook, CNBC, MSN, Women’s Health, Medical Daily, Glamour, Ask Men, etc. Steve McGough discovered the technology behind “hi” when trying to help Wendy (his wife) recover from a tragedy.

Dr. Steve McGough

"Dr. Steve McGough the author of numerous books dealing with wellness, massage, and intimacy. He has a Doctorate of Human Sexuality from the IASHS, and a BS in Biochemistry (focusing on nutrition) from UNC-Chapel Hill. Steve has an extensive background in massage and various Asian healing practices. He's the Director of R&D at Women and Couples Wellness, and a professor of Clinical Sexology. During graduate research, Steve developed new techniques to help women with anorgasmia (inability to achieve orgasm). Through this, he's worked with several thousand women and couples researching female orgasm. Steve has been published in academic journals on topics ranging from neuroscience research to sexology. He has multiple US & International patents in areas for women's pelvic and sexual health. A distinction with his approach is the view that sexual health is an integral part of overall health. Steve is frequently interviewed in Prevention, Women's Health, Medical Daily, CNBC, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, Redbook, Ask Men, etc. He & his wife Wendy frequently teach at Young Swingers Week, Naughty N Nawlins, Hedonism II, etc.
SHOW MORE ...
0 Comments
  • Anonymous